Pupil Premium Allocation

What is the Pupil Premium?

The Pupil Premium is additional funding given to schools so that they can support their disadvantaged pupils and close the attainment gap between them and their peers. The Pupil Premium has risen over the last few years nationally, with schools attracting £1900 per 'looked-after child' or £1300 per child who has been able to access free school meals within the last 6 years. 

Accountability

The government believes that head teachers and school leaders should decide how to use the pupil premium. They are held accountable for the decisions they make through:

-the performance tables which show the performance of disadvantaged pupils compared with their peers

-the Ofsted inspection framework, under which inspectors focus on the attainment of pupil groups, and in particular those who attract the pupil premium

-the reports for parents that schools have to publish online

Pupil Premium for 2016-17

The school is in receipt of the following Pupil Premium funding for academic 2016/17 financial year.

From September 2016 – March 2017 the school is in receipt of £9485

In September 2016 we had 6 pupil premium children.  As of 1st January 2017 (January census) we have 9 children eligible for free school meals. 

Definition

Funding

Sub total

Children that are ‘looked after’ or are adopted from care

£1900

 

£0

Children that have been eligible for a free school meal at any time over the past 6 years

£1320 x 6 (September - January)

9 children January - March

£9,485

Children who are part of a Service Family

£300

£0

 

Total

£9,485

This financial year, the school is utilising the Pupil Premium funding in the following ways:

Description –

Funding

 

 

ATA 0.3 to work with individuals and small groups to close the gap for

vulnerable children

£3042

ATA 0.2 to work with 2 Y6 children to make accelerated progress in reading, writing and maths

£911

Small group violin lessons for 2 able pupil premium children

£238

0.5 ATA in Class 1 to close the gap for 2 x pupil premium Year 1 children

£2311

IT reading and spelling intervention sessions for pupil premium child (IDL)

£150

15 x GAT maths sessions for 7 Y6 pupils, including 2 pupil premium Y6

£750

Reading intervention training for TA’s in Class 2 and 3 (Inference Training)

£100

2 hours per week Inference Training for pupil premium children in Years 3-6

£1014

2 hours per week Success@Arithmetic intervention for pupil premium children in Year 6

£1014

Total Pupil Premium Funding Allocated to March 2016

£9530

The Impact of Pupil Premium 2016 - 2017

  • One pupil premium child accessing support from ATA during wrap around care has made accelerated progress in reading, writing and maths up to the end of Spring Term 2017
  • Pupil premium children receiving small group violin tuition were able to build confidence and self esteem by performing in a Christmas concert to parents in school and to the general public in MOTO at Scotch Corner

  • Progress for Pupil Premium children in KS1 is above average for reading and maths and in line for writing. 
  • Progress for Pupil Premium children in KS2 is above average for reading and slightly above for writing and maths
  • 77% of pupil premium children made expected progress in reading and 44% made more than expected progress.  88% made expected progress in writing and maths and 44% made more than expected progress.  There is no gap in progress at the end of Autumn Term 2.

Barriers and issues to be addressed in school using Pupil Premium funding (2016-17)

In order to allocate money in the most suitable way, the school looked at the specific needs of the children receiving PP and set objectives to match.

One Pupil Premium child with an EHCP is not able to access all areas of the curriculum and is working well below age related expectations.

By the end of Spring  Term 2017, the writing skills of Pupil Premium children are generally lower than non-pupil premium children.

Attendance of one FSM pupil in Year 2, although improving is significantly below average.

Attendance of one FSM pupil in Y4 is below average.

Punctuality rates for pupils eligible for PP are below that for all children. This reduces their school hours and causes them to fall behind on average.

Pupil Premium 2015 - 2016

The school is in receipt of the following Pupil Premium funding for the 2015/16 financial year.

Definition

Funding

Sub total

Children that are ‘looked after’ or are adopted from care

£1900

 

£7,600

Children that have been eligible for a free school meal at any time over the past 6 years

£1320

£10,560

Children who are part of a Service Family

£300

£0

 

Total

£18,160

This financial year, the school is utilising the Pupil Premium funding in the following ways:

Description

Funding

Fund daily wrap around care for one vulnerable child – which provides daily 1:1 support for homework, reading, phonics and maths learning

£1920

ATA 0.3 to work with individuals and small groups to close the gap for

vulnerable children

£4100

ATA 0.2 to work with LAC to make accelerated progress in reading

£2733

Small group violin lessons for 2 able pupil premium children

£348

Meemo – daily intervention programme to improve working memory

£650

0.5 ATA EYFS/Year 1 to close the gap for 4 x pupil premium children

£6933

 

 

 

 

Total Pupil Premium Funding Allocated to March 2016

£16,584

The Impact of Pupil Premium Funding

  • In 2016, there were no gaps for disadvantaged pupils:
    • 100% of disadvantaged pupil in EYFS achieved a good level of development, well above the National average.
    • 100% of disadvantaged pupils passed the Year 1 phonics screening, above the National average of 70%
    • 100% of disadvataged pupils reached the National standards in reading, writing and maths, well above the National average.
  • Gaps between the progress being made in reading, writing and mathematics in the Autumn Term for pupil premium children have been closed or narrowed.
  • 2 pupil premium children in EYFS are making more than typical progress from their starting points. One pupil premium child expected on entry to Reception is on track to exceed levels of development.
  • One LAC has made more than expected progress in writing and mathematics and made less than expected progress in reading. The barrier to progress in reading is that guided reading is taught in groups and the child is not able to focus when working in a group.  In Summer 2 2016 the child will access 3 x 30 minute comprehension/ inference intervention session with an ATA and use ear defenders and a privacy board during independent reading sessions.
  • One pupil premium child accessing support from ATA during wrap around care has made accelerated progress in reading, writing and maths.
  • A free place at wrap around care has improved the attendance on one pupil premium child from 76.8% (end of Autumn 2015) to 86.9 (end of Spring 2016).

 

Pupil Premium 2014 - 2015

The impact of the PPG for 2014/2015 was:

100% of children accessing Free School Meals in KS2 reached Level 4+ in Reading, Writing and Maths.  50% of children accessing free school meals in KS2 made more than expected progress and reached Level 5 in Reading, Writing and Maths, 

In KS1 children accessing free school meals made expected progress in reading and writing and more than expected progress in maths and Reception children accessing FSM made expected or more than expected progress. 

Principles

  • We ensure that teaching and learning opportunities meet the needs of all of the pupils.
  • We ensure that appropriate provision is made for pupils who belong to vulnerable groups, this includes ensuring that the needs of socially disadvantaged pupils are adequately assessed and addressed.
  • In making provision for socially disadvantaged pupils, we recognise that not all pupils who receive free school meals will be socially disadvantaged
  • We also recognise that not all pupils who are socially disadvantaged are registered or qualify for free school meals. We reserve the right to allocate the Pupil Premium funding to support any pupil or groups of pupils the school has legitimately identified as being socially disadvantaged.
  • Pupil premium funding will be allocated following a needs analysis which will identify priority classes, groups or individuals. Limited funding and resources means that not all children receiving free school meals will be in receipt of pupil premium interventions at one time.

Provision

The range of provision the school may consider include:

  • Providing reduced class sizes to improve the teacher to pupil ratio thus providing increased opportunities for high quality teaching.
  • Providing small group work with an experienced teacher focussed on overcoming gaps in learning.
  • 1:1 support
  • Additional teaching and learning opportunities provided through trained TAs or external agencies
  • Acquiring effective materials aimed at raising standards, particularly in reading, writing and mathematics.
  • All our work through the pupil premium will be aimed at accelerating progress moving children to at least age related expectations. Initially this will be in Literacy and Numeracy
  • Pupil premium resources may also be used to target able children on FSM to achieve L3 at the end of KS1 or L5 at the end of KS2
  • Pupil premium grant may also be used to enable disadvantaged pupils to access residential visits and wrap around care. 
  • The school will publish information on how they have used their Pupil Premium Grant to address the issue of ‘narrowing the gap’, for socially disadvantaged pupils.